studio + pompom flower hazards

the water hazard, core and sand hazard warps measured out, laying on the earth, grass and sky rugs. a memento newspaper from lisa’s evacuation from nashville sums the whole situation up:

skeins of yarn, bags of hemp, baskets of hazards and other mini green ingredients have taken over my dad’s office, which we now call the “studio”:

pompom “flowers” dry on the back porch. they’ve been dipped in a liquid starch solution to stiffen them up a bit. these will form one of the hazards on the grassy stretch of the hole.

Advertisements

waffle-woven earth

got the earth strip done, using waffle weave and the randomly striped warp:

i really liked weaving this structure. the “waffle” stood out much more clearly with plainer yarns, but still gave a nice texture with fancier, more elaborate skeins. it would make a really nice blanket.

contemporary masters

how to warp an earthy loom from front to back, abridged

1. tie the bouts you’ve measured to the front beam.

2. sley the reed.

3. thread your heddles:

4. as you’re threading your heddles, tie every ten ends with a knot:

5. tie your knotted ends to the back apron rod.

6. beam your warp (wind it up on the back beam). make sure you pull it tight every few turns, and separate the threads with stiff paper or sticks:

7. tie eight ends at a time to the front apron rod with surgeon’s knots:

6. tighten and re-tighten all your knots to give an even tension over the warp:

7. throw a couple shots of thicker or doubled-up yarn to spread the warp out. these shots will be pulled out in the end:

8. ok: now weave! yalla, indeed!

measuring the earth

mahana, ever helpful, makes sure the brown yarn doesn’t get away:

first bout of “earth” warp, using random striping again, measured out:

the cross:

about two-fifths done…

my little sister jillian’s dog, rico, hanging out with the sky + grass strips:

another view:

close-up of the herringbone rug:

oh no — a broken warp!

if you weave, it’s bound to happen: a warp thread breaks. here is one of mine doing exactly that:

this one didn’t totally snap, but a few of its plies seemed to have broken, and as a result it became much, much looser than the neighboring ends.

to fix it, i pinned a new warp end to the fabric, threaded it through the correct heddle, and tied it to the good part of the broken end closer to the back beam:

then back to weaving, hemstitch it up, and i’m done with grass no.2.