Posts Tagged ‘apron rod’

weaving the bedrock+ water hazard

i’m using a diamond twill for the bedrock:

here it is wrapping up on the front beam:

the warp has four colors:

i’m using an extended herringbone twill + random warp for the water hazard. the orange cord you see below is used for the first few shots to spread out the warp (when you tie it on the front beam, the ends extend in a narrow manner that needs to become regular before weaving). next, i throw a number of shots to get the fabric going, then stop to hemstitch the ends so the fabric doesn’t unravel when i take it off the loom.

mental note: i really need to take the time stamp off the new camera.

how to warp an earthy loom from front to back, abridged

1. tie the bouts you’ve measured to the front beam.

2. sley the reed.

3. thread your heddles:

4. as you’re threading your heddles, tie every ten ends with a knot:

5. tie your knotted ends to the back apron rod.

6. beam your warp (wind it up on the back beam). make sure you pull it tight every few turns, and separate the threads with stiff paper or sticks:

7. tie eight ends at a time to the front apron rod with surgeon’s knots:

6. tighten and re-tighten all your knots to give an even tension over the warp:

7. throw a couple shots of thicker or doubled-up yarn to spread the warp out. these shots will be pulled out in the end:

8. ok: now weave! yalla, indeed!

the end of grass no.1

i’m almost done with grassy strip no.1. the whole thing is woven in 2/2 twill with the randomly striped warp and lots of weft striping.

here it is wound up on the front beam:

below is the back apron rod. you can tell i’m pretty much done because this is the end of the warp, and it’s getting super close to the heddles.

you can also see my “fix” for a mistake in threading at the beginning of this strip. twills really benefit from a “floating selvedge,” a weft end on each side of the fabric that is not threaded through a heddle (so it doesn’t move up and down with the shafts). you wrap the weft around the floating selvedge on each shot in order to avoid long pieces of selvedge that aren’t incorporated into the fabric due to twill’s pattern. it’s a little hard to describe, but becomes readily apparent while weaving if you forget.

so, if you need to add a weft end in after you’ve already warped the loom, you can use a weight to hang the end over the back beam, giving it the same tension as the other ends. the weight i’m using is a thick block of kiln-formed glass i made in a class taught by my friend, glass artist sarinda jones (props to my mom, cindy, for the class!). i wrapped the yarn around the center of the block and held it in place with a rubber band. worked like a charm!

the fabric is hemstitched in yellow and cut off the loom:

all done and ready to be pulled off:

nothing more fun than warping a floor loom!

now, for the task i have to admit i’ve been slightly dreading: warping the loom.

it’s not rocket science to warp a loom (did i ever mention i was on a short list to be in a nuclear engineer for the navy?). there are simple steps, and if you follow them one by one, with patience and time to spend, you’ll have a warped loom, guaranteed.

1. tie your measured bouts to the breast beam
2. thread the reed
3. thread your heddles
4. tie on to the back apron rod
5. beam your warp
6. tie on to the front apron rod

simple, right? ha.

the good news is, i pretty much went through this process with no major screw ups. i didn’t double-thread any reeds or heddles, i lined my warp up pretty even on the loom, and ended up with a nice, even tension across the width. pretty sweet, really, when i consider how many times i had to re-warp a 6″ wide scarf i wove last winter. the only thing that i really need to tighten up is the time spent — i’ve calculated that i need to warp the loom 12 times in the next 6 weeks, so i’ve got to get it down to an art.

i think i can, i think i can, i think i can….