Posts Tagged ‘cross’

piecer, painter, golf hole maker

lisa is the official “painter of the sides”:

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measuring the earth

mahana, ever helpful, makes sure the brown yarn doesn’t get away:

first bout of “earth” warp, using random striping again, measured out:

the cross:

the herringbone grass

my second strip of grass is going to be woven in a herringbone twill with a color-graduated warp. here’s the first bout (first 150 ends of the 300 ends i need) measured out on the warping board:

the high-tech little method below is what i use to keep track of the count. for every 10 ends, you wrap the yarn. i need 150, so 15 wraps will do me. the yellow thread at the very bottom is my guide for wrapping on the warping board… for instance, if i need 3.2 yards, i measure a guide thread to that length, figure out the path between pegs that works perfectly, then follow that path for my measuring.

next is a photo i took with a cool little iphone app named hipstamatic that my sister turned me on to. yeah, its fun, but i quickly realized it doesn’t serve the purpose of clear documentation very well. in any case, this is the second bout measured out, and you can see i’m beginning to tie it up with all the various knots that help keep it from tangling up after its taken off the warping board.

below is the first shot of green, and you can see the herringbone pattern and graduated colors of the warp. to get this pattern, i had to switch up the threading of the heddles from 1-2-3-4-1-2-3-4 (straight) to 1-2-3-4-3-2-1 (point). the new threading took me quite a while to get used to, and i spent a fair amount of time double- and triple-checking my work, making it go pretty slow.

then, to make matters worse, i hadn’t foreseen that, compared to a straight threading, double the amount of heddles would be needed on shafts 2 and 3, and about half as many on shafts 1 and 4. i noticed this when i was about 3/4 done threading the first bout, but waited til i had used up all the heddles on shafts 2 and 3 before moving some over from shafts 1 and 4. can you say HUGE pain the ass? it is WAY easier to move heddles when you don’t have over half of them threaded. blah.

this is my weavie helper, mahana, making sure the weft yarn on my shuttle doesn’t get out of hand.

random stripes and tapestry moves

for the first strip of “grass,” i decided to randomly stripe the warp. i pulled simultaneously from about 7 spools of my 8/4 cotton carpet yarn and wrapped them on the warping board. then, when i was holding the cross and sleying the reed, i randomly picked a color to sley. this process gives a sense of continuity to the random stripe since the same colors occur within every 7 warps, but allows enough variation to keep it from looking overly planned. i LOVE the result, but have to say that beaming the warp (wrapping the warp on the back beam) was a pretty tangled process.

about halfway in to my 8′ length on this warp, i decided to play around with some tapestry moves to create a little “flower patch.” to begin with, i pulled two colors of yarn in, one from each side, and wrapped them around each other before beating. then i open the next shed and take each yarn back out to their respective edges:

i also tinkered with three colors:

i really like the process, but because of the deadline i have for this project, i don’t think i’ll be doing much more of it. it takes much more time. pretty cool, though!

my fairway is going to be really, really big sampler

yes, i’ve been “gone” for quite a while… the super short version is that i have moved from utah to colorado. the move has taken up the bulk of my time since my last post, but i’m back on the loom and whipping carpets out once again.

i’ve decided this fairway, on one level, is best approached as a large sampler. i really like this idea… it brings to mind the samplers that women would produce for both decoration and practice, and it will also provide a somewhat linear example of weaving techniques as my fairway progresses from tee-off to hole.

in the sampler spirit, the first piece i weave has a one-color warp (all white) and will be woven in plain weave with a striped weft. below are some photos from warping the loom for this first bit of “sky” tee-off rug.

this is my hand holding the cross, which is the “X” i got from the warping board. the cross helps me keep the ends straight while i thread the reed.

i use a sley hook to pull each end through the reed, which, when i’m done with one bout (150 ends), looks like this:

you can see the next bout tied to the front beam, awaiting their turn. once the reed has been sleyed (sounds so medieval, no?), we have all the ends ready for threading the heddles. in the next photo, the sleyed ends are draped over the shafts, just kinda hanging out:

i’ll have to post a photo in the future of the rest of the warping process… never fear, i will have plenty of opportunity to take more pictures of it.

measuring the first warp

ok, i was sick for a week, then spent the past few days catching back up with things, but i’m back at the loom and ready to measure out my first warp.

the first part of my mini green that i’m going to weave is the 4′ x 4′ tee off area. my loom will only weave 2′ wide warps, so i’ll weave two 2′ x 4′ pieces and attach them to make the final 4′ x 4′ tee off space.

i’m going to measure my first 4′ length with all white warp. i’m not sure if the warp will get totally covered over by the weft, and don’t want to use up any good colors in the warp if that’s the case.

here’s the first bout of the first warp on the warping board:

measuring the first warp

measuring the first warp

i need 300 ends (strings) for my 2′ wide warp, but as i was winding and winding, i realized pretty quickly that the pegs on my warping board would only hold about 150 ends. it took me a dumb second to realize you could measure more than one bout for your warp (a “bout” is kinda like a “bundle”).

here’s another view, showing some of the little strings and knots used to help keep count and to make sure the bundle doesn’t fall apart once you take it off:

first bout on the warping board

first bout onthe warping board

at the very end, you can see the “cross” — that’s what i’ll hold in my hand when i transfer the ends to the loom (when i thread the reed, to be specific).

onward brave weaver….