Posts Tagged ‘grass’

studio + pompom flower hazards

the water hazard, core and sand hazard warps measured out, laying on the earth, grass and sky rugs. a memento newspaper from lisa’s evacuation from nashville sums the whole situation up:

skeins of yarn, bags of hemp, baskets of hazards and other mini green ingredients have taken over my dad’s office, which we now call the “studio”:

pompom “flowers” dry on the back porch. they’ve been dipped in a liquid starch solution to stiffen them up a bit. these will form one of the hazards on the grassy stretch of the hole.

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about two-fifths done…

my little sister jillian’s dog, rico, hanging out with the sky + grass strips:

another view:

close-up of the herringbone rug:

oh no — a broken warp!

if you weave, it’s bound to happen: a warp thread breaks. here is one of mine doing exactly that:

this one didn’t totally snap, but a few of its plies seemed to have broken, and as a result it became much, much looser than the neighboring ends.

to fix it, i pinned a new warp end to the fabric, threaded it through the correct heddle, and tied it to the good part of the broken end closer to the back beam:

then back to weaving, hemstitch it up, and i’m done with grass no.2.

the herringbone grass

my second strip of grass is going to be woven in a herringbone twill with a color-graduated warp. here’s the first bout (first 150 ends of the 300 ends i need) measured out on the warping board:

the high-tech little method below is what i use to keep track of the count. for every 10 ends, you wrap the yarn. i need 150, so 15 wraps will do me. the yellow thread at the very bottom is my guide for wrapping on the warping board… for instance, if i need 3.2 yards, i measure a guide thread to that length, figure out the path between pegs that works perfectly, then follow that path for my measuring.

next is a photo i took with a cool little iphone app named hipstamatic that my sister turned me on to. yeah, its fun, but i quickly realized it doesn’t serve the purpose of clear documentation very well. in any case, this is the second bout measured out, and you can see i’m beginning to tie it up with all the various knots that help keep it from tangling up after its taken off the warping board.

below is the first shot of green, and you can see the herringbone pattern and graduated colors of the warp. to get this pattern, i had to switch up the threading of the heddles from 1-2-3-4-1-2-3-4 (straight) to 1-2-3-4-3-2-1 (point). the new threading took me quite a while to get used to, and i spent a fair amount of time double- and triple-checking my work, making it go pretty slow.

then, to make matters worse, i hadn’t foreseen that, compared to a straight threading, double the amount of heddles would be needed on shafts 2 and 3, and about half as many on shafts 1 and 4. i noticed this when i was about 3/4 done threading the first bout, but waited til i had used up all the heddles on shafts 2 and 3 before moving some over from shafts 1 and 4. can you say HUGE pain the ass? it is WAY easier to move heddles when you don’t have over half of them threaded. blah.

this is my weavie helper, mahana, making sure the weft yarn on my shuttle doesn’t get out of hand.

2′ by 8′ of tweed grass

finished strip of tweed grass using a randomly striped warp, shown here on my parent’s kitchen floor:

i also randomly kicked the tweed’s direction back and forth.

detail of an area of shag loops and bit of tapestry:

i love the loops and the tapestry, but since i have limited time to complete the fairway, these will probably be the only areas with experimental (for me) techniques like this. but i can already scheme for future projects….