Posts Tagged ‘hemstitch’

100 sq ft… check!

last night, i finished weaving the square footage needed for the mini golf hole! it was more exciting and relieving than i could have predicted, even though we still have a lot of work to do making hazards and pulling the whole piece together. nevertheless, i poured myself a nice, cold, new belgium mothership wit at the end, sat down to a super delicious dinner of chicken marsala (thank you, lisa!) and basked in the glory for at least an hour afterwards. Continue reading

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weaving the bedrock+ water hazard

i’m using a diamond twill for the bedrock:

here it is wrapping up on the front beam:

the warp has four colors:

i’m using an extended herringbone twill + random warp for the water hazard. the orange cord you see below is used for the first few shots to spread out the warp (when you tie it on the front beam, the ends extend in a narrow manner that needs to become regular before weaving). next, i throw a number of shots to get the fabric going, then stop to hemstitch the ends so the fabric doesn’t unravel when i take it off the loom.

mental note: i really need to take the time stamp off the new camera.

oh no — a broken warp!

if you weave, it’s bound to happen: a warp thread breaks. here is one of mine doing exactly that:

this one didn’t totally snap, but a few of its plies seemed to have broken, and as a result it became much, much looser than the neighboring ends.

to fix it, i pinned a new warp end to the fabric, threaded it through the correct heddle, and tied it to the good part of the broken end closer to the back beam:

then back to weaving, hemstitch it up, and i’m done with grass no.2.

the end of grass no.1

i’m almost done with grassy strip no.1. the whole thing is woven in 2/2 twill with the randomly striped warp and lots of weft striping.

here it is wound up on the front beam:

below is the back apron rod. you can tell i’m pretty much done because this is the end of the warp, and it’s getting super close to the heddles.

you can also see my “fix” for a mistake in threading at the beginning of this strip. twills really benefit from a “floating selvedge,” a weft end on each side of the fabric that is not threaded through a heddle (so it doesn’t move up and down with the shafts). you wrap the weft around the floating selvedge on each shot in order to avoid long pieces of selvedge that aren’t incorporated into the fabric due to twill’s pattern. it’s a little hard to describe, but becomes readily apparent while weaving if you forget.

so, if you need to add a weft end in after you’ve already warped the loom, you can use a weight to hang the end over the back beam, giving it the same tension as the other ends. the weight i’m using is a thick block of kiln-formed glass i made in a class taught by my friend, glass artist sarinda jones (props to my mom, cindy, for the class!). i wrapped the yarn around the center of the block and held it in place with a rubber band. worked like a charm!

the fabric is hemstitched in yellow and cut off the loom:

all done and ready to be pulled off:

hemstitching and cleavage

for those paying attention, this post is a dead giveaway that i am blogging with old information… catching up with myself, as it were.

here is a great photo of shilo’s cleavage as she hemstiches the plaid sky in preparation to take it off the loom (i also hemstitch at the beginning of each piece, right after it goes on the loom):

for some reason, hemstiching in red is one of my favorite parts of the whole process… something compelling about how neatly it binds the edges. i like edges in general. i’d like to experiment with more edge and binding techniques, but for this project, since the edges will be hidden, there’s really no point.

why red? with the colors i use, the contrast appeals to me. it reminds me of blood, flowers, molten lava, berries, arteries. shocking and good and necessary.