Posts Tagged ‘weft’

some final mini stuff

well, today is the last day of the exhibit. on a total high note, the show recently won a 2010 salt lake city weekly arty award for best sculpture/mixed media exhibition!

a couple good links:

fixes
to follow my previous whine about how i didn’t construct the obstacles in a manner to survive the clumsy feet of the masses, i’ve been meaning to post photos of the fixes and adjustments that super-fab artist, salt lake art center preparator and friend jared steffensen (who also won a 2010 arty!) did for my golf hole in mid august. i’ve wanted to collaborate with jared ever since i first stumbled in to his poor yorick studio years ago, so i’m thrilled with this unexpected collaboration of sorts. thanks, jared!!!

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details of a mini green

i’ve been completely remiss in posting these detail shots. these were taken right before the vip opening reception, before the masses attacked. 🙂

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all my carpets

nothing like laying on wool carpets wearing blue jeans in 90+ degree sun:

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the herringbone grass

my second strip of grass is going to be woven in a herringbone twill with a color-graduated warp. here’s the first bout (first 150 ends of the 300 ends i need) measured out on the warping board:

the high-tech little method below is what i use to keep track of the count. for every 10 ends, you wrap the yarn. i need 150, so 15 wraps will do me. the yellow thread at the very bottom is my guide for wrapping on the warping board… for instance, if i need 3.2 yards, i measure a guide thread to that length, figure out the path between pegs that works perfectly, then follow that path for my measuring.

next is a photo i took with a cool little iphone app named hipstamatic that my sister turned me on to. yeah, its fun, but i quickly realized it doesn’t serve the purpose of clear documentation very well. in any case, this is the second bout measured out, and you can see i’m beginning to tie it up with all the various knots that help keep it from tangling up after its taken off the warping board.

below is the first shot of green, and you can see the herringbone pattern and graduated colors of the warp. to get this pattern, i had to switch up the threading of the heddles from 1-2-3-4-1-2-3-4 (straight) to 1-2-3-4-3-2-1 (point). the new threading took me quite a while to get used to, and i spent a fair amount of time double- and triple-checking my work, making it go pretty slow.

then, to make matters worse, i hadn’t foreseen that, compared to a straight threading, double the amount of heddles would be needed on shafts 2 and 3, and about half as many on shafts 1 and 4. i noticed this when i was about 3/4 done threading the first bout, but waited til i had used up all the heddles on shafts 2 and 3 before moving some over from shafts 1 and 4. can you say HUGE pain the ass? it is WAY easier to move heddles when you don’t have over half of them threaded. blah.

this is my weavie helper, mahana, making sure the weft yarn on my shuttle doesn’t get out of hand.

the end of grass no.1

i’m almost done with grassy strip no.1. the whole thing is woven in 2/2 twill with the randomly striped warp and lots of weft striping.

here it is wound up on the front beam:

below is the back apron rod. you can tell i’m pretty much done because this is the end of the warp, and it’s getting super close to the heddles.

you can also see my “fix” for a mistake in threading at the beginning of this strip. twills really benefit from a “floating selvedge,” a weft end on each side of the fabric that is not threaded through a heddle (so it doesn’t move up and down with the shafts). you wrap the weft around the floating selvedge on each shot in order to avoid long pieces of selvedge that aren’t incorporated into the fabric due to twill’s pattern. it’s a little hard to describe, but becomes readily apparent while weaving if you forget.

so, if you need to add a weft end in after you’ve already warped the loom, you can use a weight to hang the end over the back beam, giving it the same tension as the other ends. the weight i’m using is a thick block of kiln-formed glass i made in a class taught by my friend, glass artist sarinda jones (props to my mom, cindy, for the class!). i wrapped the yarn around the center of the block and held it in place with a rubber band. worked like a charm!

the fabric is hemstitched in yellow and cut off the loom:

all done and ready to be pulled off:

random stripes and tapestry moves

for the first strip of “grass,” i decided to randomly stripe the warp. i pulled simultaneously from about 7 spools of my 8/4 cotton carpet yarn and wrapped them on the warping board. then, when i was holding the cross and sleying the reed, i randomly picked a color to sley. this process gives a sense of continuity to the random stripe since the same colors occur within every 7 warps, but allows enough variation to keep it from looking overly planned. i LOVE the result, but have to say that beaming the warp (wrapping the warp on the back beam) was a pretty tangled process.

about halfway in to my 8′ length on this warp, i decided to play around with some tapestry moves to create a little “flower patch.” to begin with, i pulled two colors of yarn in, one from each side, and wrapped them around each other before beating. then i open the next shed and take each yarn back out to their respective edges:

i also tinkered with three colors:

i really like the process, but because of the deadline i have for this project, i don’t think i’ll be doing much more of it. it takes much more time. pretty cool, though!

hemstitching and cleavage

for those paying attention, this post is a dead giveaway that i am blogging with old information… catching up with myself, as it were.

here is a great photo of shilo’s cleavage as she hemstiches the plaid sky in preparation to take it off the loom (i also hemstitch at the beginning of each piece, right after it goes on the loom):

for some reason, hemstiching in red is one of my favorite parts of the whole process… something compelling about how neatly it binds the edges. i like edges in general. i’d like to experiment with more edge and binding techniques, but for this project, since the edges will be hidden, there’s really no point.

why red? with the colors i use, the contrast appeals to me. it reminds me of blood, flowers, molten lava, berries, arteries. shocking and good and necessary.