Posts Tagged ‘wool’

some final mini stuff

well, today is the last day of the exhibit. on a total high note, the show recently won a 2010 salt lake city weekly arty award for best sculpture/mixed media exhibition!

a couple good links:

fixes
to follow my previous whine about how i didn’t construct the obstacles in a manner to survive the clumsy feet of the masses, i’ve been meaning to post photos of the fixes and adjustments that super-fab artist, salt lake art center preparator and friend jared steffensen (who also won a 2010 arty!) did for my golf hole in mid august. i’ve wanted to collaborate with jared ever since i first stumbled in to his poor yorick studio years ago, so i’m thrilled with this unexpected collaboration of sorts. thanks, jared!!!

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details of a mini green

i’ve been completely remiss in posting these detail shots. these were taken right before the vip opening reception, before the masses attacked. 🙂

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final thoughts on the mini green, or learning to let go

well, it’s been a little over two weeks since the opening of contemporary masters, and lisa and i have begun a completely new adventure: moving to the virgin islands. this permanent move (lisa is already there, i leave july 15) has been enough to take my mind off the golf hole for a while, but my friend tiffini just posted a link to some photos of a recent utah museum of fine arts/young benefactors event held on the course, and it brought my attention back to my piece. Continue reading

contemporary masters vip reception @ the salt lake art center

the vinyl  information on the floor in front of each hole:

FINALLY DONE!!! —-> Continue reading

all my carpets

nothing like laying on wool carpets wearing blue jeans in 90+ degree sun:

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bedrock + stone and cave pool hazards

finished strip for the bedrock, plus the base of the cave pool hazard and the felted stone hazards:

closeup of the diamond twill pattern… it shows up more clearly with more “regular” yarns, and quite knobbly with thicker, varied yarns:

i love the way this herringbone pattern evokes water. this strip will form the base of the cave pool hazard, which will hopefully divert golfers’ balls off course right before they putt out of the bedrock and into the core, where the hole will be:

weaving the bedrock+ water hazard

i’m using a diamond twill for the bedrock:

here it is wrapping up on the front beam:

the warp has four colors:

i’m using an extended herringbone twill + random warp for the water hazard. the orange cord you see below is used for the first few shots to spread out the warp (when you tie it on the front beam, the ends extend in a narrow manner that needs to become regular before weaving). next, i throw a number of shots to get the fabric going, then stop to hemstitch the ends so the fabric doesn’t unravel when i take it off the loom.

mental note: i really need to take the time stamp off the new camera.

waffle-woven earth

got the earth strip done, using waffle weave and the randomly striped warp:

i really liked weaving this structure. the “waffle” stood out much more clearly with plainer yarns, but still gave a nice texture with fancier, more elaborate skeins. it would make a really nice blanket.

about two-fifths done…

my little sister jillian’s dog, rico, hanging out with the sky + grass strips:

another view:

close-up of the herringbone rug:

the herringbone grass

my second strip of grass is going to be woven in a herringbone twill with a color-graduated warp. here’s the first bout (first 150 ends of the 300 ends i need) measured out on the warping board:

the high-tech little method below is what i use to keep track of the count. for every 10 ends, you wrap the yarn. i need 150, so 15 wraps will do me. the yellow thread at the very bottom is my guide for wrapping on the warping board… for instance, if i need 3.2 yards, i measure a guide thread to that length, figure out the path between pegs that works perfectly, then follow that path for my measuring.

next is a photo i took with a cool little iphone app named hipstamatic that my sister turned me on to. yeah, its fun, but i quickly realized it doesn’t serve the purpose of clear documentation very well. in any case, this is the second bout measured out, and you can see i’m beginning to tie it up with all the various knots that help keep it from tangling up after its taken off the warping board.

below is the first shot of green, and you can see the herringbone pattern and graduated colors of the warp. to get this pattern, i had to switch up the threading of the heddles from 1-2-3-4-1-2-3-4 (straight) to 1-2-3-4-3-2-1 (point). the new threading took me quite a while to get used to, and i spent a fair amount of time double- and triple-checking my work, making it go pretty slow.

then, to make matters worse, i hadn’t foreseen that, compared to a straight threading, double the amount of heddles would be needed on shafts 2 and 3, and about half as many on shafts 1 and 4. i noticed this when i was about 3/4 done threading the first bout, but waited til i had used up all the heddles on shafts 2 and 3 before moving some over from shafts 1 and 4. can you say HUGE pain the ass? it is WAY easier to move heddles when you don’t have over half of them threaded. blah.

this is my weavie helper, mahana, making sure the weft yarn on my shuttle doesn’t get out of hand.